Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Moving Image Istanbul 2014 Special Events

            ISTANBUL
            September 25-28, 2014

 

Moving Image Istanbul 2014 is very pleased to announce the schedule of Special Events:
 
Thursday, 25 September
2-5PM (14:00–17:00)
VIP preview of Moving Image Istanbul 2014
By invitation only.

5-9PM (17:00–21:00)
Moving Image Vernissage
FREE and open to the public.


Friday, 26 September
4-5.30PM (16:00-17:30)
Collectors Roundtable with Sabine Brunckhorst (Germany), Haro Cumbusyan (Turkey), Robert Bielecki (US), and Saruhan Dogan (Turkey).  Moderated by Edward Winkleman
.
Moving Image Gallerist Lounge
Free and open to the public. Seats are limited.

Saturday, 27 September
4-5.30PM (16:00–17:30)
Artist screening and Q&A

Mari Spirito, Founding Director of Protocinema, and art historian/arts writer Nicole O’Rourke in conversation with emerging artist Atalay Yavuz.
This intimate talk will be accompanied by a screening.
Moving Image Gallerist Lounge
Free and open to the public. Seats are limited.


 
 7-10:30PM (19:00-22:30)
“Bring Your Own Beamer” @ Pera Museum
Emerging video artists, curated by Fatma Çolakoğlu and Ulya Soley
Open to the public. www.peramuzesi.org.tr
Meşrutiyet Caddesi No.65, 34443 Tepebaşı – Beyoğlu
+ 90 212 334 99 00

Sunday, 28 September
2-3:30PM (14:00-15:30)
Round table discussion organized by Sanatatak
Ege Berensel, Derya Yücel, Yasemin Özcan, Ulya Soley moderated by Melis Tezkan
Moving Image Gallerist Lounge
Free and open to the public. Seats are limited.
 
 Wolfgang Staehle, The Road, 2011, video animation in collaboration with Jan Gerber
 24' x 8'. Courtesy the artist and Postmasters Gallery, New York.
___________________________________________________
 
Participating artists / Galleries & Non-Profit Institutions
Nancy Atakan / Pi Artworks (Istanbul, Turkey)*
Nancy Atakan & Volkan Aslan / 5533 (Istanbul, Turkey)*
Nino Cais / Central Galeria de Arte (Sao Paulo, Brazil)
Rob Carter / Morgan Lehman Gallery (New York, NY)
Tianzhuo Chen / Vanguard Gallery (Shanghai, China)
Sue de Beer / Marianne Boesky Gallery (New York, NY)
Sirma Doruk / Mixer (Istanbul, Turkey)
Chris Doyle / Catharine Clark Gallery (San Francisco, CA)
Mounir Fatmi / Galerie Analix Forever (Paris, France)
Shaun Gladwell / Mark Moore Gallery (Culver City, CA)*
Florian Japps / ROCKELMANN & (Berlin, Germany)
Gizem Karakaş / Moving Image Presents (New York, NY)
Gulnara Kasmalieva and Muratbek Djumaliev / Winkleman Gallery (New York)
Elena Kovylina / Galerie Analix Forever (Paris, France)
Dinh Q. Le / Shoshana Wayne Gallery (Los Angeles, CA)
HeeWon Lee / Galerie Dix9 (Paris, France)
Rollin Leonard / TRANSFER (Brooklyn, NY)*
Basim Magdy / artSümer (Istanbul, Turkey)
Jonathan Monaghan / Curator’s Office (Washington DC)*
Hans Op de Beeck / Marianne Boesky Gallery (New York, NY)
Serkan Özkaya / Postmasters (New York, NY)
Şener Özmen / PİLOT (Istanbul, Turkey)*
Bongsu Park / Rosenfeld Porcini (London, UK)
Zeyno Pekünlü / Sanatorium (Istanbul, Turkey)
Wolfgang Staehle / Postmasters (New York, NY)
Kurt Stallaert / Pavleye Art & Culture (Prague, Czech Republic)
Leslie Thornton / Winkleman Gallery (New York, NY)
Allard van Hoorn / Galerie Esther Donatz (Munich, Germany)
Susanne Wagner / Galerie Jo van de Loo (Munich, Germany)
David Wojnarowicz / P·P·O·W (New York, NY)

*Designates that Moving Image Istanbul will be the artwork's World Premiere.
____________________________________________


Moving Image Istanbul
September 25-28, 2014
 
Hours:
Thu, Sept 25, 2014: 17:00 – 21:00 (Vernissage)
Fri, Sept 26, 2014: 12:00 – 20:00
Sat, Sept 27, 2014: 12:00 – 20:00
Sun, Sept 28, 2014: 12:00 – 18:00


Admission: FREE

Kuleli Building
Haliç Congress Centre
Sütlüce Mah. Karaagaç Cad. No.19 34445
Beyoglu, Istanbul / TURKEY

 
 
Moving Image was founded by Murat Orozobekov and Edward Winkleman. For more information about Moving Image, contact Ed or Murat at 212.643.3152 or email us at contact@moving-image.info. Or visit the www.moving-image.info.
 
For updates on exhibitors and our special panel discussion programming information, please visit the Moving Image website  http://www.moving-image.info
 
Follow us on Facebook; Twitter (with hashtag  #MI14Istanbul); and Instagram.

Monday, September 15, 2014

Leaflock and Skinbark

I know...I'm a party pooper....a killjoy...a prig and a poseur.

While I am a big believer in not taking yourself too seriously, I still know it's dumb to expect anyone else in the world to take you more seriously than you're seen to be taking yourself.

Whether they intend to or not, the recognized leaders of the art world bestow serious legitimacy on the work of celebrity artists they are seen to be mugging for the cameras with or otherwise feeding off their fame. This applies as equally to those who present the artwork in their galleries as it does to those who'll pose with those celebrities at their openings.


The problem lies not with recognizing that they're famous. I've hung out with famous people, and yes, it's fun. In fact, I wish more wealthy celebrities were interested in the fine art world (particularly as collectors, but...). The immediate problem is twofold in my opinion. First, it sends a signal to the long-working artists out there that (despite all the lectures these same leaders of the art world will give on the topic) it's actually not "the work" that counts most. How someone famous jumps ahead to claim the time and attention of the tastemakers sends signals through the entire system. In short, it's unfair to those artists to raise their expectations with talk about "the work" and have them see you mock such sentiments shortly thereafter. Second, it cheapens the context in which other artwork is shown, and that's also unfair to the artists who have also shown or will show in those contexts.

Again, the art world often takes itself way too seriously and that's also a problem, and this is not a complaint about extending the fine art world's view to include and encompass more of culture at large. It's a complaint about letting celebrities cut to the head of the queue, just because they're famous. There are a lot of other artists out there patiently waiting that time and attention.

The improbability of this version of that photo says it all to me:




Wednesday, September 03, 2014

Moving Image Istanbul 2014 Participating Artists /Galleries & Non-Profit Institutions

ISTANBUL
September 25-28, 2014

Moving Image art fair is very pleased to announce the artists and participating galleries and non-profit institutions in our inaugural edition in Istanbul. Being held in the Kuleli Building at the Halic Congress Center, September 25-28, 2014, Moving Image Istanbul runs in parallel with ArtInternational art fair, and will present a selection of single-channel videos and installations from across the globe. Moving Image has been conceived to offer a viewing experience with the excitement and vitality of a fair, while allowing moving-image-based artworks to be understood and appreciated on their own terms.
 
Highlights of the 2014 Istanbul fair include several world premeires, including videos by Şener Özmen (PİLOT Gallery, Istanbul); Jonathan Monaghan (Curator's Office, Washington DC); Shaun Gladwell (Mark Moore Gallery, Culver City); and Nancy Atakan & Volkan Aslan (5533, Istanbul). Single-channel videos at the fair include works by Nino Cais (Central Galeria de Arte, Sao Paulo); Chen Tianzhuo (Vanguard Gallery, Shanghai), and Mounir Fatmi (Galerie Analix Forever, Paris). Among the historical films in the fair are works by David Wojnarowicz (P•P•O•W, New York) and Leslie Thornton (Winkleman Gallery, New York). Several large installations include works by Wolfgang Staehle (Postmasters, New York); Hans Op de Beeck (Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York); Basim Magdy (artSümer, Istanbul); and Sue de Beer (Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York).
 
Among the special events sponsored by Moving Image Istanbul are "Bring Your own Beamer" (BYOB) at Pera Museum, a one-night exhibition/performance by unrepresented, emerging Turkish film and video artists who will take over the fifth floor gallery hall of Pera Musuem in an improvised installation. Curated by Fatma Çolakoğlu and Ulya Soley, BYOB at Pera Museum runs 19:00-22:00, Saturday, September 27, 2014. Also Mari Spirito, Founding Director of Protocinema, will host a screening and conversation with emerging artist Atalay Yavuz, who works with readily available materials. This events will take place at Moving Image on Saturday, September 27, 16:00–17:30.

 
Participating artists / Galleries & Non-Profit Institutions
[as of September 1, 2014]

 
Nancy Atakan / Pi Artworks (Istanbul, Turkey)*
Nancy Atakan & Volkan Aslan / 5533 (Istanbul, Turkey)*
Nino Cais / Central Galeria de Arte (Sao Paulo, Brazil)
Rob Carter / Morgan Lehman Gallery (New York, NY)
Chen Tianzhuo / Vanguard Gallery (Shanghai, China)
Sue de Beer / Marianne Boesky Gallery (New York, NY)

Sirma Doruk / Mixer (Istanbul, Turkey)
Chris Doyle / Catharine Clark Gallery (San Francisco, CA)
Mounir Fatmi / Galerie Analix Forever (Paris, France)
Shaun Gladwell / Mark Moore Gallery (Culver City, CA)*
Florian Japps / Rockelmann & (Berlin, Germany)
Gizem Karakaş / Moving Image Presents (New York, NY)
Gulnara Kasmalieva and Muratbek Djumaliev / Winkleman Gallery (New York)
Elena Kovylina / Galerie Analix Forever (Paris, France)
Dinh Q. Le / Shoshana Wayne Gallery (Los Angeles, CA)
HeeWon Lee / Galerie Dix9 (Paris, France)
Rollin Leonard / TRANSFER (Brooklyn, NY)*
Basim Magdy / artSümer (Istanbul, Turkey)
Jonathan Monaghan / Curator's Office (Washington DC)*    
Hans Op de Beeck / Marianne Boesky Gallery (New York, NY)
Serkan Özkaya / Postmasters (New York, NY)
Şener Özmen / PİLOT (Istanbul, Turkey)*
Bongsu Park / Rosenfeld Porcini (London, UK)
Zeyno Pekünlü / Sanatorium (Istanbul, Turkey)
Wolfgang Staehle / Postmasters (New York, NY)
Kurt Stallaert / Pavleye Art & Culture (Prague, Czech Republic)
Leslie Thornton / Winkleman Gallery (New York, NY)
Allard van Hoorn / Galerie Esther Donatz (Munich, Germany)
Susanne Wagner / Galerie Jo van de Loo (Munich, Germany)
David Wojnarowicz / P·P·O·W (New York, NY)

*Designates that Moving Image Istanbul will be the artwork's World Premiere.

Curatorial Advisory Committee for Moving Image Istanbul 2014
 
Paula Alzugaray
Independent curator
São Paulo, Brazil

Sabine Brunckhorst
Collector
Hamburg, Germany

Dan Cameron
Chief Curator, Orange County Museum of Art
Newport Beach, California

Kathleen Forde
Artistic Director, Borusan Contemporary Istanbul
New York, NY, and Istanbul, Turkey

Kenichi Kondo
Curator, Mori Art Museum
Tokyo, Japan

Azra Tüzünoglu
Founder and Director, PILOT Gallery
Istanbul, Turkey


Moving Image is online exclusively at Artsy.net.


Moving Image gratefully acknowledges the generous support of our media partners and sponsors:
 
 
     
   

Hotel Partners
   
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Selected press about Moving Image Istanbul 2014:
 
Moving Image Istanbul
September 25-28, 2014
 
Hours:
Thu, Sept 25, 2014: 17:00 – 21:00 (Vernissage)
Fri, Sept 26, 2014: 12:00 – 20:00
Sat, Sept 27, 2014: 12:00 – 20:00
Sun, Sept 28, 2014: 12:00 – 18:00


Admission: FREE

Kuleli Building
Haliç Congress Centre
Sütlüce Mah. Karaagaç Cad. No.19 34445
Beyoglu, Istanbul / TURKEY
 
 
Moving Image was founded by Murat Orozobekov and Edward Winkleman. For more information about Moving Image, contact Ed or Murat at 212.643.3152 or email us at contact@moving-image.info. Or visit the www.moving-image.info.
 
For updates on exhibitors and our special panel discussion programming information, please visit the Moving Image website  http://www.moving-image.info
 
Follow us on Facebook; Twitter (with hashtag  #MI14Istanbul); and Instagram.

Monday, August 25, 2014

Space to Succeed : Open Thread

Affordable space. So much of success in the art world comes down to affordable space.

If you ask anyone why there seems to be an artist migration to Los Angeles (and it's a bit early yet to conclude it will last any longer than the migration to Berlin did), many will tell you it's affordable space. It's big-enough studios (at affordable prices) to make the work they'd rather make, as opposed to the work the New York spaces they could afford could accommodate. Indeed, nearly every emerging artist I know comments on how space influences their decisions in what they can/should make in New York.

A few of the folks interviewed in the article linked to above cited "anonymity" as the reason for artists moving to Los Angeles:

In L.A., artists can test things out without the glare of the spotlight,” says Ali Subotnik, a curator at the Hammer Museum, who moved from New York in 2006.
On one hand, I think that anonymity is only an issue once you're no longer all but entirely anonymous anyway, as so many artists in New York or any large city continue to be. On the other hand, though, it's obvious that it's LA's vast scale that aids folks in "disappearing."

The article continues to explore the "anonymity" appeal:

“The proximity to the entertainment industry guarantees that the art world will never be the main industry in this town, so artists are able to work on the sidelines.” 
But the art world will never be the main industry in New York either. Finance and Real Estate will always outshine (and influence, if not crush) the art world here. So, again, I conclude it's mostly the affordable space that explains the appeal. Part of my opinion here, of course, is influenced quite subjectively by how the price-per-square-foot you hear of for gallery spaces in Culver City (for example) can make a grown dealer in Chelsea cry (and then get back on the phone to plead again for that next sale...).

Indeed, the migration or expansion of several New York galleries to LA recently would often seem to involve decisions about more space to succeed, but that overall picture there strikes me as based
a bit more on complex art market strategies than on more-direct artist production needs strategies. Essentially, space in LA is so affordable that New York galleries can open a satellite there as a way (as a dealer friend of mine put it) "to cockblock any LA gallery" who might have designs on their top-selling artists. Not that any New York-based galleries have come out and cited that as their primary motivation (that I know of), but Emmanuel Perrotin did note a while back that this was one of his primary reasons for opening a space in New York:
There are other, practical reasons for the Manhattan opening. New York dealers poach other galleries’ artists so aggressively it may as well be a blood sport, and Perrotin feels the pressure. “My dream is to be able to keep my artists and to not feel so much the shadows of someone who wants to take what you have. It’s not an egomaniac situation. I don’t want to be the biggest; I just don’t want to lose. So I need to make a move.”
I'm bringing all this up in response to a recent quote by Shepard Fairey (on Page Six, no less):
“You can’t be in New York and not have ­either a trust fund or a good enough job to live,” Fairey explained at a Hennessy V.S luncheon at Soho House New York celebrating his label design for a limited-edition bottle. “Artists are screwed in New York right now,” he said.
Not all artists, obviously---some are enjoying Hennessy V.S luncheons at Soho House, but I digress...
Asked about LA’s growing popularity as a center for emerging artists, Fairey noted, “The reason why LA is becoming a hub is because LA still has affordable spaces for artists to have studios.”
Meanwhile, back in New York, just stick a fork in Brooklyn, and, as one recent headline for an article on the fever pitch for space on the Bowery put it, "There are no bargains left on the once-seedy strip." Which isn't to say dealers in New York are out of ideas. They're not. These are determined and often quite creative types, we're talking about here. But just that it's getting harder any way you look at it.

That which doesn't kill us....


Consider this an open thread on what space means to your goals.

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

A Little Help From My Friends...

As you may know, I am the author of the book How to Start and Run a Commercial Art Gallery. My publisher, Allworth Press, has asked for a follow-up book (tentatively titled Selling Contemporary Art: How to Navigate the Evolving Market), which is designed to explore how art sellers are strategizing through a range of shifts in the contemporary art market since the first book was written (back in 2008). Some of these developments include: The Rise of the Mega-Gallery; The Rise of the Art Fair; Selling Art via Online Channels; The Increasing Globalization of the Art Market, etc.

The bulk of the book is based on interviews with other dealers, art fair directors, and collectors. It is organized into three sections: outside factors (things beyond any dealer's control); inside factors (things dealers can individually do in response to the developments); and a section written in conjunction with an attorney on how changes to existing (or new) contract models might help address some of these challenges. It is important to me, though, to have the book reflect the needs and goals of all parties involved in the art market.

Toward that end, I am reaching out to artists, collectors and gallerists, and asking if you would please consider completing a quick survey about specific topics that relate to themes in the book. None of these surveys is comprehensive, nor designed to be...they're designed to hopefully provide some insights into some stubbornly hazy concepts within the shifting art market. In short, there's a method to my madness in how each is formulated.

  Your participation in the quick survey below that applies to you will be entirely anonymous. I cannot tell who submitted which answers. Even if I can guess, no names will be recorded or published.
Feel free to browse any of the surveys below if you like, but I ask (please) only submit your answers if you are actively engaged as an artist, or a collector of contemporary art, or a dealer of contemporary art, respectively. And only submit your answers once, please.

Because of this open call, we will of course need to cull through the submissions and delete any that feel mischievous. I would like to include your opinions on these matters, though, so I'll encourage you to be frank, but don't vent so colorfully that we'd need to exclude your answers. Again, your responses will be entirely anonymous.

Thank you in advance for your time and consideration! I truly appreciate it.



Artists Survey

Collectors Survey

Gallerists Survey

Friday, July 11, 2014

Announcing “The Borusan Contemporary Art Collection Prize” for Moving Image Istanbul


Moving Image art fair is very pleased to announce the creation of The Borusan Contemporary Art Collection Prize. Funding the acquisition of an artwork exhibited at Moving Image Istanbul for The Borusan Contemporary Art Collection, the prize grants $10,000 to purchase new work for their esteemed collection.

Moving Image co-founders Murat Orozobekov and Edward Winkleman noted, “The international reputation of the Borusan Contemporary Art collection was one of the major considerations in our choosing Istanbul for the third location of the Moving Image art fair. Few collections anywhere have the depth, adventurous spirit, or energy of this carefully considered anthology of important contemporary new media artwork, and we are so honored and delighted that they are sponsoring this prize. We are extremely grateful to The Borusan Contemporary Art Collection for their very generous support of our first edition of Moving Image Istanbul.”

Kathleen Forde added, "As the Artistic Director of Borusan Contemporary, the exhibiting institution grounded in shows presenting, relating to or inspired by the collection, and having a long standing enthusiasm for the unique and important mission of the Moving Image Art Fair . . . I'm delighted and proud that the collection will be supporting this venture."

ABOUT BORUSAN CONTEMPORARY
Founded in 2010, Borusan Contemporary is the leading platform for media arts in Turkey. Housed in the historic Perili Köşk mansion on the European shore of the upper Bosphorous, it consists of two gallery spaces for temporary exhibitions and new commissions as well as an extensive ‘Office Museum’ for the display of curated selections from the Borusan Contemporary Art Collection. The Borusan Contemporary art collection includes nearly 600 artworks encompassing such diverse media as oil paintings, sculpture, video art, installations, new media, print editions, light art and photography. It contains print editions by Jim Dine, Donald Judd and Sol LeWitt; light art installations by Brigitte Kowanz, Keith Sonnier, François Morellet and Doug Aitken; paintings by Peter Zimmermann, Gerwald Rockenschaub and Markus Linnenbrink; as well as sculptures by Liam Gillick, Manfred Wakolbinger and Ernest Trova. Artists such as Zimoun, Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, U-Ram Choe, Daniel Rozin and Daniel Canogar are featured in the Collection's new media segment, and Monika Bravo, Marina Zurkow, Kutluğ Ataman and Manfred Mohr are standout names in the video art section.

ABOUT MOVING IMAGE
Moving Image was conceived to offer a viewing experience with the excitement and vitality of a fair, while allowing moving image-based artworks to be understood and appreciated on their own terms. Participation is by invitation only by the Moving Image Curatorial Advisory Committee, who invite a selection of international commercial galleries and non-profit institutions to present single-channel videos, single-channel projections, video sculptures, and other larger video installations. Moving Image was founded by Murat Orozobekov and Edward Winkleman of New York's Winkleman Gallery.

For more information, contact Murat Orozobekov at (1) 212.643.3152 (USA) or email us at contact@moving-image.info.




Moving Image Istanbul
September 25-28, 2014

Kuleli Building Haliç Congress Centre
Sütlüce Mah. Karaagaç Cad. No.19 34445
Beyoglu, Istanbul / TURKEY

  Twitter: https://twitter.com/movingimageinfo
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Moving- Image/100614893348265

Instagram: http://instagram.com/movingimageartfair




www.moving-image.info


Moving Image Istanbul:  Online exclusively at Artsy.net      

Thursday, July 10, 2014

Deadhead Sticker on a Cadillac

It's problematic on many levels, I know, but the more I hear artists justify selling out via their art, the more I realize that art has become my religion. Which explains why such justifications offend me on a practically spiritual level.

I'm increasingly agnostic with regard to the traditional concept of a deity, and all but hostile to most forms of organized religion, except where they provide social rituals that help celebrate / comfort people through various stages of life (yes, I know, it's unfair for me to expect that side of it without also agreeing to the the often silly and more often offensive subjugation sides of most of them), but I've been OK with not having religion in my life because I've substituted the Evangelical teachings I grew up on with a firm belief in the evidence of humankind's innate capacity to self-regulate on an ethical and moral level that the creation and appreciation of art can provide.

Which isn't to say I like moralizing art, or art that avoids the messier aspects of difficult human issues (on the contrary, the best of organized religion actually delves deeply into these as well). But rather that there's no need to accept that unless people conform to the interpretation of some "god"'s will that the geographical and socio-economic circumstances of their birth randomly coerce them to follow that people will automatically behave any less morally than anyone else. Most humans instinctively feel what's the right or wrong way to behave in almost any situation. Knowing ethical from unethical behavior is actually extremely easy as a concept: ethical behavior is almost universally the way you'd prefer other people to act toward you.


It's very likely just the ability of social media to expose us to opinions we previously may have gone an entire life without hearing, but I actually believe it's something more than that. It feels like a cultural shift. Increasingly I'm reading online this or that artist's opinion that cheating the system or scheming within the system to get ahead, through the creation/promotion/sale of their art is not only OK with them, but their due, because of how difficult they feel their life has been.

I suspect this perceived "right" to get ahead at any cost is fairly common across any industry in this country (after all, we are the children of a generation who saw Gordon Gekko as a role model), but for me (and apparently the artists, collectors, and other dealers I've surrounded myself with) art had always been a sanctuary from such attitudes. Art had been the last bastion for professionals who believed in higher ideals than just getting what I can.


And yet, when I express such ideas on Facebook, the types of responses I get are (these are real):
"There 's nothing wrong with making money through these buying, selling, sneaking in unknowns, collectives, first opens, corporate Ponzi schemes"
and
"Ethics are something I might exchange since I am a victim of my parents' ethics, not a trustfund baby..."
and justifying such positions for
"those of us who were artists, yet had to work as service workers with the bridge and tunnel people, the rednecks from Staten Island, Bronx, etc. and raise families without proper food, etc."
I have tried to look at such positions from an objective point of view. In particular, I realize that many artists are sold a bill of goods by art schools and graduate with more debt than their dream of earning a living from their art will likely even cover the interest on. This puts tremendous pressure on them and their families. I also realize that when artists who intentionally game the market system as part of their practice are celebrated as among the best artists of their generation, the lines here can get a bit blurry unless you really pay attention. But most often, I read such things and think "who the hell are you, and what did you do with the actual human artist whose body you're inhabiting?"

Artists should emerge from their thorough explorations in looking/seeing and in particular their education in the humanities as, well, better humans. In my experience, most do. But specifically, within my concept of the role of art as a form of religion, artists are the leaders...the perceptive ones able to see and communicate sincerely with the rest of us the more important or at least interesting aspects of what it means to be a human here and now. That position comes with certain responsibilities, though. If they're not at least attempting to be good humans (and that is incompatible with willingly scheming or cheating others), then they're just hucksters demanding attention for wholly narcissistic reasons.

I know these are very high expectations to have of another human.... So?


More than just my admittedly perhaps warped sense of art as a religion, though, comments like this are particularly troublesome in an arena that purports to trade in concepts involving our better selves:
"There 's nothing wrong with making money through these buying, selling, sneaking in unknowns, collectives, first opens, corporate Ponzi schemes"
Actually, the law says otherwise. Some of these activities are quite specifically illegal, and therefore, socially at least, the very definition of "wrong."  If you can't be an ethical "artist," the rest of us can at least insist you behave as an ethical citizen.
 
Now here I should clarify that my sense of what makes an artist ethical or not is entirely unrelated to their personal life (my concern is only with a professional ethics). Indeed, I use the term "ethics" here wholly within the context of a strict adherence to the integrity of their work and (because we accept that "art" is important to humankind) honesty in how that work is traded. Moreover, the license society gives artists to behave in ways that are unacceptable for the rest of us (dressing down for formal functions, spending days just "thinking" about their work, essentially having total control over their workplace and hours, actually being invited to speak truth to power, etc.) is given in part because we expect something quite simple back in return. We expect artists themselves to lead the way in treating art like the cultural treasure they're asking the rest of us to view it as...in other words, to take "art" seriously. Suggesting it's ok to cheat or scheme with one's art is not taking it seriously as a cultural treasure.